Deirdre Wilson

Deirdre Wilson is a senior editor and content research manager at UbiCare. She is an award-winning writer and editor with 30 years’ experience researching and writing on a wide range of health, wellness and education topics for newspapers, magazines and a news wire service.
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Recent Posts

Whether Mandatory or Voluntary, Bundled Payments Depend on Patient Activation

Posted by Deirdre Wilson on Jun 19, 2018 1:32:01 PM

Mandatory bundled payment programs for joint replacement offer “more robust, generalizable evidence” than voluntary programs. That’s the main finding of a new study of data from Medicare and the American Hospital Association Annual Survey.

And yet, with the never ending, constantly shifting priorities that hospital staff need to balance, the implication that mandatory bundled payments might be better is a tricky one. This study does not claim definitively that they are. Rather, the authors state, there’s a place for both types of programs in the push to get more hospitals using bundled payment plans. 

The study highlights that the shift to value-based care, particularly in orthopedics, is going strong. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) wants to move this transition forward with bundled payments. Whether mandatory or voluntary, it’s wise to proactively get ahead of CMS’s efforts by implementing a patient activation solution that puts you in control.

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Topics: Value-Based Care, Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement, Healthcare Technology, Episode of Care, patient activation

Remembering the Nation’s Pediatrician

Posted by Deirdre Wilson on Mar 14, 2018 2:09:16 PM

T. Berry Brazelton understood the value of connecting with his patients—and their parents

T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., had an extraordinary knack for interpreting the needs of infants and young children. But his greatest gift may have been the ability to zero in on the stress and anxiety of American parents, offering them just the right dose of comfort, acknowledgement and information.

All without ever really telling them what to do.

“I do not believe in telling people how to parent,” he once told me during an interview. “I don’t like parenting courses. I don’t think they really serve a purpose, and, in a way, they are negative. They say, ‘We know how to do it and you don’t.’

“I would rather expose what’s going on with the child and then what’s going on with the parent, and let them put the two together and see how to make sense of it.”

With Brazelton’s passing yesterday (2 months shy of his 100th birthday), children, parents, pediatricians and child development experts worldwide have lost a beloved caregiver and advocate. Following on the heels of revered child development expert Benjamin Spock, M.D., Brazelton has been called the nation’s last great parenting icon.

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Topics: Patient Experience

Want Success with Total Joint Replacement Outpatients? Teach Them Well!

Posted by Deirdre Wilson on Feb 8, 2018 8:40:00 AM

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As more hospitals turn to same-day discharge for joint replacement patients, it’s more important than ever to make sure those patients know what to expect, how to care for themselves post-op and how to get the most from their recovery at home.

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Topics: Patient Engagement, Healthcare Technology, Episode of Care

CMS Changes Its Star Ratings, But Patients Remain Key to Hospital Success

Posted by Deirdre Wilson on Dec 22, 2017 4:44:19 PM

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) ended 2017 by revising the ratings hospitals depend on as bellwethers for their reputation with patients, payers and regulators alike.

CMS’s hospital star ratings are calculated from data on 7 care-quality indicators: mortality, safety of care, readmissions, patient experience, effectiveness of care, timeliness of care and efficient use of medical imaging.

The agency’s new formula for determining star ratings addresses what had been a significant bell curve of hospitals with stars ranging from 1 to 5 (with 5 being the highest rating). Previously, few hospitals had 1 or 5 stars; most had 2, 3 or 4.

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